Tag: Art

Ibrahim Mahama Lazarus

Published on 24th September 2021

15 September – 7 November 2021 White Cube Bermondsey White Cube Bermondsey is pleased to present ‘Lazarus’, an exhibition of new works by Ibrahim Mahama, including large-scale installation, sculpture, collage and film. The artist’s third show with the gallery, the works come together to address the passage of time, the notion of obsolescence and the potential for regeneration. The artist’s new groups of collages, which vary in size from the monumental to the domestic, are mostly named after recent popular music titles, all of which address the climate crisis, reflecting the urgent global paradigm shift. Made up from archival notes, drawings, and photographs, the collages combine repeated images of silos and bats with colonial-era maps, bank notebooks, orders and ledgers from the 1960s and 70s; all now defunct paper residue. Echoing the formations of bats, which hang in rhythmic rows from the ceiling of the silos, the collages are informed by a lyrical, topographical patterning. When considered in relation to historical colonial domination ­– and its effects of blotting out, spoiling and appropriating – the collage technique embodies the many troubled aspects of Ghana’s multi-layered past. More here.

Art Walks

Published on 30th April 2021

London Bridge is one of the capital’s oldest and most iconic neighbourhoods, boasting artistic, medical, historical and maritime connections to events that have shaped the city’s history. Our series of Art Walks have been mapped in order to introduce you to some of these connections, old and new. Self-guided, easy to follow and free, our walks are all outside – apart from London Bridge Station, so please bring a mask to walk through the concourse. Our itineraries: Art Walk 1 (50 mins) Art Walk 2 (60 mins) Routes and contents compiled by D. Davies.  

Introductions: Emma Cousin at White Cube Online

Published on 29th January 2021

Emma Cousin’s figurative paintings feature dynamic, carnivalesque scenarios that explore the space between realism and fantasy, felt experience and communication. Responding to the limitations of language when used to articulate the complexities of human experience and emotions, Cousin considers how we might interact without it, in pre- or post-linguistic states. Taking this idea of ‘the failure of language to the ultimate point’, she imagines how the gestures of the body would now take over. ‘Introductions | Emma Cousin’ is curated by Capucine Perrot, Associate Director, Artist Liaison. See the exhibition. 

Medical Culture Festival – Life Saviours: Then and Now

Published on 14th January 2021

New FREE online festival to celebrate medical heritage, health and wellbeing in the heart of London Bridge.  Join us for this celebration of health and wellbeing in the heart of London Bridge February 17-24, 2021. New for 2021, Medical Culture Festival: Life Saviours Then and Now, is an online festival from the London Bridge Medi-Culture District partners. The online programme of free events includes talks, panel discussions, workshops and walking tours about the history of medicine and the future of health. The full programme is available at teamlondonbridge.co.uk/lifesaviours-events London Bridge has a long history connected with health and well-being, which was institutionalised after the first hospital was established in the area around the 12th century in what is now Southwark Cathedral. Followed by Old St Thomas’s Hospital in the 13th century and Thomas Guy Hospital in the 18th century, this area has seen the Black Death, the Cholera outbreak, the Spanish Flu and more recently the Covid-19 Pandemic.  Fascinating, fun and deeply significant to today, the festival tells the story of the people and places that have played their part in the history and development of health and medicine.  The programme will appeal to a wide audience, including sessions for families and young people. Places can be reserved at teamlondonbridge.co.uk/lifesaviours. Some events will have limited places available. Find out more here. Places are limited, so book your place today! Partners: Florence Nightingale Museum, Gordons Pathology Museum, Guys and St Thomas’s Hospital, Kings College London, The Old Operating Theatre, London Borough of Southwark, Team London Bridge.

Missoni: Art & Colour

Published on 11th January 2021

Explore the Fashion and Textile Museum’s popular exhibition, MISSONI ART COLOUR, organised by the MA*GA Art Museum in collaboration with Missoni, with the Museum’s Head of Exhibitions, Dennis Nothdruft. With the founding of their eponymous company in 1953 in Gallarate, Italy, Ottavio and Rosita Missoni changed the fashion world’s – and our – perceptions of the knitted garment forever. The combination of Ottavio’s interest in art, design and colour, and Rosita’s innate sensibility to clothing engendered a whole new approach to dressing. The inaugural Missoni collection, called ‘Milano-Simpathy’, was presented by the couple at the famous La Rinascente store in 1958. A fashion show for the press was staged in 1966; the unconventional use of colour and pattern in knit made it the first of many successful shows over the following decades. Join the Fashion and Textile Museum for this Online Event and discover the creative process of Italian fashion house, Missoni, and the textiles of Ottavio and Rosita Missoni, in the context of 20th century fine art. One of the most respected exponents of the ‘Made in Italy’ concept, the work of Ottavio and Rosita Missoni is deeply rooted in modern art, making the Missoni brand distinctive in the world of international fashion. Tickets are £5. Book now. 

Get Creative with Tower Bridge at Home

Published on 08th January 2021

Uncategorised

Tower Bridge may not be open, but there are plenty of activities you can dive into at home! Designed to compliment and enhance your a visit along with your knowledge of Tower Bridge, these family friendly activities are sure to do just that. Children’s Art Week 2020 Learn to marble, make your own comic strip and even try some origami! Learn Semaphore Semaphore is a way of sending messages to people who you can see but are too far away to talk to. Using your arms (or flags), you can spell out words – each position means a different letter. Before the radio was invented, semaphore was used to communicate with ships to check they were ready to pass through. Making a moving Tower Bridge Picture Got a printer, scissors and blutak to hand? Create your own moving Tower Bridge picture with this cut out. Make a stop motion film Recreate the moving bus that jumped over an opening Tower Bridge in 1952! Make an origami boat  Thousands of boats pass under Tower Bridge every year. Follow the instructions to make your very own origami flotilla. Dot to dot and colouring sheets  Pens and pencils at the ready! Enjoy a series of dot to dots and colouring sheets.  

Foale and Tuffin: Made in England

Delve into the 1960s, with a look back at the exhibition Foale & Tuffin: Made in England, curated by Head of Exhibitions Dennis Nothdruft in 2009/10. Through this online talk, Dennis will explore the work of these two influential designers who were at the heart of the cultural explosion in London in the sixties. The Foale and Tuffin label was what cool girls wore – colourful, pop-inspired mini-dresses and trend-setting trouser suits were just some of the key pieces that were ahead of their time in developing popular, desirable fashion. Foale and Tuffin: Made in England charts the very personal story of two women who set up on their own with just a lot of courage and £200 in their pockets, to becoming two key British fashion designers of the 1960s and the part they played in creating the changing London scene. Book now.

The Skill of Narrative & Stitched Textiles

The 62 Group of Textile Artists presents The Skill of Narrative & Stitched Textiles, the third talk in their popular annual lecture series at the Fashion and Textile Museum. This online lecture will introduce 62 Group members Emily Jo Gibbs and Richard McVetis and their respective projects The Value of Making and The Potential of Stitch. The Value of Making (a series of hand stitched portraits of makers) by Emily Jo Gibbs Emily investigates how by taking the time to slowly describe someone in stitch you convey your admiration. Celebrating people who make things by the investment of time in making their portraits, a quiet, thoughtful act of care and value. Emily will describe how this project grew out of a collaboration with Bridget Bailey exploring how one might make a portrait of an Artist and evolved into the championing of people who make things for a living, depicting them through the tools that they use. Initially Emily chose seven contemporary Makers whose work she admired because of their design aesthetic, making skills and materiality, across a broad range of disciplines. Katie Treggiden wrote, ‘there are things Emily is able to articulate through the physically invested work of stitching…. that might elude both writers and photographers’. Gibbs will conclude by talking about her latest project that continues the conversation The Potential of Stitch by Richard McVetis This paper explores a 15-year fascination and obsession with a single stitch technique and how the expressive properties of this process have enabled Richard to visualise abstract concepts such as Time and Space. It is through stitch and making that Richard investigate time and place. Using hand embroidery, he records his time through multiples of dots, lines, and crosses meticulously stitched. Each drawn mark or stitch is a mantra; the stitches become markers of lived time. This seemingly humble, inconsequential repetitive action often overlooked and dismissed as part of the mundane. Connotations of the domestic reduce these actions to the field of the home, of the amateur, for Richard, however, it restores a sense of order. It informs a more profound comprehension and connection to the world. There is intimacy in this labour-intensive way of making; the ritual and repetition create an in-depth focus and an internal Space-Time specific to the artist. This thinking will be explored through a series of McVetis’s recent artworks, whilst also referring to the practice of Agnes Martin and Vija Celmins, whose deep focus and skill helped translate feelings and the world around them. Book now. 

Rear Window at White Cube

Published on 04th January 2021

‘Rear Window’ is an online exhibition at White Cube, inspired by Alfred Hitchcock’s famous 1954 film about the seductions, and the dangers, of looking. Hitchcock returned obsessively to the theme of voyeurism, delighting in forcing on his audience the queasy thrills of the unobserved observer, and implicating them in the associated risks of seeing what one shouldn’t, or misinterpreting what one sees. ‘Rear Window’ is an invitation to consider how artists construct scenes and suggest narratives, use cinematic devices to tease our innate voyeurism, and how they explore and challenge the idea of ‘the gaze’ which Hitchcock’s film was instrumental in formulating. Curated by Susanna Greeves, Director, Museum Liaison, White Cube. Artists: Ellen Altfest, Jeff Burton, Gillian Carnegie, Julie Curtiss, Judith Eisler, Celia Hempton, Danica Lundy, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Laurie Simmons, Jeff Wall and Carrie Mae Weems.\ See the exhibition here. 

New artworks by Mark Titchner celebrate the London Bridge community

Published on 18th September 2020

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Have you spotted Mark Titchner’s new artworks in London Bridge yet? The way we experience our shared spaces has changed dramatically over the past few months. As the London Bridge area starts to welcome back more visitors Team London Bridge has collaborated with Mark Titchner to celebrate the strength and solidarity of the community in a new series of artworks. This collaboration with Mark Titchner evolves his relationship with the area and brings focus to the dynamic cultural identity of London Bridge.   “The original concept for this series of artworks was based on the idea of offering a nurturing, reassuring presence as we ease back into our un/familiar streets. However, as I developed the texts for the works, I also felt a sense that this moment – despite all the difficulty – presents an immense opportunity; the opportunity to build a better version of what we had before. As such the aesthetic style of the works shifted away from something soothing towards something bold and celebratory. Reflecting a hope that despite all the challenges so far and those yet to come, we will be together again in the streets we know and love.”  – Mark Titchner You can find these artwork on Newcomen Street, opposite Crol and Co coffee shop and at the top of Bermondsey Street Tunnel, between Pizza Pilgrims and Honest Burgers. Keep your eyes peeled for more to come! Share your images of the artwork with the tags: #HopeRevealsTheWorld #TheSunRisesBright