Tag: Exhibition

Testing Ground

Published on 23rd September 2022

Testing Ground is an exhibition of five collaborative projects between King’s College London researchers and creative practitioners, it reveals how conversations between artists, researchers, and wider communities can change the ways we think about and engage with the world around us. You can explore their work by visiting Testing Ground at Science Gallery from Tuesday 20 September 2022, for more information please click here. These projects have been developed through King’s Artists, a residency scheme which places artists within faculties across the university. Learn more about them here.

Kaffe Fassett: The Power of Pattern

Published on 22nd September 2022

Kaffe Fassett is one of the most successful artists and designers working in contemporary craft today. His career spans over 50 years with a prolific oeuvre that encompasses knitting, needlepoint, mosaic, quilting, textile design, painting and drawing. His books and projects have encouraged millions to make and to create. Kaffe Fassett’s inspiration comes from everything around him; his inimitable eye can translate the most everyday of details into the base for one of his colourful, sophisticated maximalist designs. These designs by Kaffe and the Kaffe Fassett Collective textile designers – Brandon Mably and Philip Jacobs – are used and interpreted by quilters around the globe. The exhibition will feature works from international quilters and makers. Kaffe Fassett: The Power of Pattern will explore Fassett’s world, drawing on original artworks from invited makers as well as Kaffe Fassett and Brandon Mably and Philip Jacobs, textiles works, photographs and archival material to illuminate the work of this distinctive, influential artist and designer. This exhibition is accompanied by the book Kaffe Fassett: The Artist’s Eye by our Head of Exhibitions, Dennis Nothdruft and is available to pre-order now. Book tickets

150 Years of the Royal School of Needlework: Crown to Catwalk

Published on 03rd March 2022

In 1872, the Royal School of Needlework (RSN) was founded on two key principles – the first, the preservation of hand embroidery as an art form and the second, the support of women’s independence through work. In the intervening 150 years, the RSN’s journey towards these goals has taken many unexpected forms and featured countless high-profile projects. 150 Years of the Royal School of Needlework will explore this historic organisation’s contribution to the world of embroidery. The exhibition will present collaborations with the great names of the Arts and Crafts movement, commissions produced for the British royal family, contemporary works created for top, international designers and pieces by the RSN’s talented students. Presenting textiles from the Royal School of Needlework’s own 5,000-piece archive, alongside examples from museums and collections across the UK, this in-depth retrospective will display the often surprising history of one of the UK’s oldest and most revered applied arts organisations. The exhibition is curated by Dennis Nothdruft, head of exhibitions at the Fashion and Textile Museum, in collaboration with Dr Susan Kay-Williams, chief executive at the Royal School of Needlework. About the Royal School of Needlework Founded in 1872, the Royal School of Needlework (RSN) is the international centre of excellence for the art of hand embroidery and will be celebrating its 150th anniversary in 2022. Steeped in history with unrivalled expertise in the techniques of hand embroidery, the RSN offers a wide range of courses for all levels, from beginners through to advanced. Students can choose to study courses online and onsite, including day and evening classes and the Certificate & Diploma in Technical Hand Embroidery. The RSN also teaches BA (Hons) Hand Embroidery and the Future Tutors Programme, which trains tutors for the next generation. The Royal School of Needlework is based at Hampton Court Palace and teaches across the UK and internationally. For more information, visit royal-needlework.org.uk. 1 April – 4 September 2022 Daily, 11.00 – 18.00 £12.65. Some concessions may apply Plan your visit

The Ocean Awards Photography Exhibition

Published on 24th September 2021

London Bridge City is excited to host the Ocean Photography Awards exhibition. The awards celebrate our beautiful blue planet and also highlights the many plights it is facing. The exhibition will be held from 18 September – 17 October and encourages visitors to stop and begin their conversation about conservation. The exhibition is part of London Bridge City’s Recycling Week campaign which takes place from 20 September – 26 September highlighting the importance of recycling, sustainability and preventing plastic pollution. Above photo by Sebastien Pontoizeau, finalist for Adventure Photographer of the Year, Ocean Photography Awards.  

LARKING: The Thames and Beyond

An exhibition to celebrate the release of A Field Guide to Larking by Lara Maiklem, author of the bestselling Mudlarking: Lost and Found on the River Thames Larking is the art of looking for the little treasures that are all around us, on beaches (beachlarking), in fields (fieldlarking), at home (houselarking and gardenlarking) and of course mudlarking in rivers, especially on the Thames, and A Field Guide to Larking is an illustrated guide to how to give it a go yourself. This exhibition brings pages from the book to life with real artefacts: objects from Lara’s own collection and treasures borrowed from other larkers. It also features some of the original illustrations by Johnny Mudlark and Chiz Harwood. The display includes commonly found Thames objects – nails, pottery and buttons, – alongside more rare and unique objects, such as an Iron Age pot, a Roman scabbard chape and medieval Pilgrim badges Many of the pieces are on public display for the first time and each one has its own story to tell. Larking reveals the variety of historic objects that are waiting for the curious eye and also challenges our concept of rubbish. Included in the exhibition are works by ceramic artist Raewyn Harrison and jeweller Liz Willis, both of whom take their inspiration from larking on the river Thames and the artefacts they find. Their work shows how lost and forgotten objects can be transformed and inspire something new and beautiful. A Field Guide to Larking is illustrated by Johnny Mudlark and archaeological illustrator Chiz Harwood. The exhibition is curated by foreshore archaeologist Mike Webber. FREE Entry Larking: The Thames and Beyond is on display in Lancelot’s Link from 21 July – 30 October and entry is via the Cathedral courtyard on the north side of the Cathedral opposite the River Thames. More here.

Ibrahim Mahama Lazarus

15 September – 7 November 2021 White Cube Bermondsey White Cube Bermondsey is pleased to present ‘Lazarus’, an exhibition of new works by Ibrahim Mahama, including large-scale installation, sculpture, collage and film. The artist’s third show with the gallery, the works come together to address the passage of time, the notion of obsolescence and the potential for regeneration. The artist’s new groups of collages, which vary in size from the monumental to the domestic, are mostly named after recent popular music titles, all of which address the climate crisis, reflecting the urgent global paradigm shift. Made up from archival notes, drawings, and photographs, the collages combine repeated images of silos and bats with colonial-era maps, bank notebooks, orders and ledgers from the 1960s and 70s; all now defunct paper residue. Echoing the formations of bats, which hang in rhythmic rows from the ceiling of the silos, the collages are informed by a lyrical, topographical patterning. When considered in relation to historical colonial domination ­– and its effects of blotting out, spoiling and appropriating – the collage technique embodies the many troubled aspects of Ghana’s multi-layered past. More here.

Beautiful People: The Boutique in 1960s Counterculture

Published on 28th June 2021

“We were young, rich and beautiful, and the tide – we thought – was turning in our favour. We were going to change everything, of course, but mostly we were going to change the rules.” – Marianne Faithfull. In the mid-1960s a handful of Chelsea boutiques sparked a fashion revolution. Freed and fuelled by creative exploration and experimentation, they began selling radical clothing to the counterculture youth. Their outrageously flamboyant designs were inspired by romantic ideas of the past; Byron-esque frilled shirts were paired with Regency brocades and plush velvet trousers were mixed with influences from Morocco and the Far East. They blurred gender boundaries with increasingly androgynous styles, creating an explosion of colour, pattern and decoration. Beautiful People explores fabulous and rare examples from these era-defining stores and designers, examining the shared free spirit of Granny Takes A Trip, Hung On You, Apple, Biba, Mr Fish, Thea Porter, Ossie Clark and more. Clothes worn by the likes of the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and Jimi Hendrix will be displayed as part of recreations of these iconic boutiques. Book tickets.

Introductions: Emma Cousin at White Cube Online

Published on 29th January 2021

Emma Cousin’s figurative paintings feature dynamic, carnivalesque scenarios that explore the space between realism and fantasy, felt experience and communication. Responding to the limitations of language when used to articulate the complexities of human experience and emotions, Cousin considers how we might interact without it, in pre- or post-linguistic states. Taking this idea of ‘the failure of language to the ultimate point’, she imagines how the gestures of the body would now take over. ‘Introductions | Emma Cousin’ is curated by Capucine Perrot, Associate Director, Artist Liaison. See the exhibition. 

Rear Window at White Cube

Published on 04th January 2021

‘Rear Window’ is an online exhibition at White Cube, inspired by Alfred Hitchcock’s famous 1954 film about the seductions, and the dangers, of looking. Hitchcock returned obsessively to the theme of voyeurism, delighting in forcing on his audience the queasy thrills of the unobserved observer, and implicating them in the associated risks of seeing what one shouldn’t, or misinterpreting what one sees. ‘Rear Window’ is an invitation to consider how artists construct scenes and suggest narratives, use cinematic devices to tease our innate voyeurism, and how they explore and challenge the idea of ‘the gaze’ which Hitchcock’s film was instrumental in formulating. Curated by Susanna Greeves, Director, Museum Liaison, White Cube. Artists: Ellen Altfest, Jeff Burton, Gillian Carnegie, Julie Curtiss, Judith Eisler, Celia Hempton, Danica Lundy, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Laurie Simmons, Jeff Wall and Carrie Mae Weems.\ See the exhibition here. 

Discover HMS Belfast Story

Published on 29th December 2020

Uncategorised

Whilst you are unable to visit in person, IWM have created an interactive timeline where you’re able to explore the HMS Belfast Story. Discover it’s history, hear the unique stories of those who served on board, and read about the adventures that the Royal Navy cruiser embarked on as a world-touring warship, from the Arctic Circle to East Asia. Explore the timeline here.  Image: HMS Belfast leaving Scapa Flow for the Normandy beaches, June 1944. © IWM (A 25665) ©IWM (A 25665)