Tag: London Bridge Culture

Medical Culture Festival – Life Saviours: Then and Now

Published on 14th January 2021

Join us for this celebration of health and wellbeing in the heart of London Bridge February 17-24, 2021. London Bridge has a long history connected with health and well-being, which was institutionalised after the first hospital was established in the area around the 12th century in what is now Southwark Cathedral. Followed by Old St Thomas’s Hospital in the 13th century and Thomas Guy Hospital in the 18th century, this area has seen the Black Death, the Cholera outbreak, the Spanish Flu and more recently the Covid-19 Pandemic.  The people living through every single one of these medical disasters tried to do what they could to stay healthy, to stay safe, while the medical practitioners searched for answers to their needs and cures for the diseases. Washing hands, wearing masks, keeping social distance are not new things. Caring for people’s physical as well as mental health has been paramount throughout every single time period. This festival aims to celebrate the people and practices that have made a difference in the past and in the present. They will paint a picture of a community that has fought and continued to be resilient.  This new festival is a celebration of health and wellbeing in the heart of London Bridge February 17-24, 2021. Partners: Florence Nightingale Museum, Gordons Pathology Museum, Guys and St Thomas’s Hospital, Kings College London, The Old Operating Theatre, London Borough of Southwark, Team London Bridge. Find out more here. Events available to book from 18 January.

Missoni: Art & Colour

Published on 11th January 2021

Explore the Fashion and Textile Museum’s popular exhibition, MISSONI ART COLOUR, organised by the MA*GA Art Museum in collaboration with Missoni, with the Museum’s Head of Exhibitions, Dennis Nothdruft. With the founding of their eponymous company in 1953 in Gallarate, Italy, Ottavio and Rosita Missoni changed the fashion world’s – and our – perceptions of the knitted garment forever. The combination of Ottavio’s interest in art, design and colour, and Rosita’s innate sensibility to clothing engendered a whole new approach to dressing. The inaugural Missoni collection, called ‘Milano-Simpathy’, was presented by the couple at the famous La Rinascente store in 1958. A fashion show for the press was staged in 1966; the unconventional use of colour and pattern in knit made it the first of many successful shows over the following decades. Join the Fashion and Textile Museum for this Online Event and discover the creative process of Italian fashion house, Missoni, and the textiles of Ottavio and Rosita Missoni, in the context of 20th century fine art. One of the most respected exponents of the ‘Made in Italy’ concept, the work of Ottavio and Rosita Missoni is deeply rooted in modern art, making the Missoni brand distinctive in the world of international fashion. Tickets are £5. Book now. 

ANANSI THE SPIDER RE-SPUN – DIGITAL THEATRE

Published on 08th January 2021

An online theatre experience about the infamous trickster spider. Created and directed by Justin Audibert Inspired by the 2019 five-star hit show, Anansi the Spider, about the infamous mischief-maker and master spinner of yarns, Unicorn have adapted these classic West African and Caribbean tales for Unicorn Online. Made with their film partner, Illuminations, Unicorn have creatively responded to the current situation – the cast filmed themselves in their own homes so that they can bring them to yours! The free Anansi videos are accompanied by free creative learning resources for teachers to use with pupils aged 4 – 8 to explore the Anansi tales and their place in Black history and culture. As part of Unicorn Online, during the COVID-19 pandemic, Unicorn are offering a range of free online theatrical experiences that we hope will be enjoyed by children across London, the UK and beyond. Anansi the Spider Re-spun is free to watch on our YouTube channel until 31 March 2021. Find out more. 

Foale and Tuffin: Made in England

Delve into the 1960s, with a look back at the exhibition Foale & Tuffin: Made in England, curated by Head of Exhibitions Dennis Nothdruft in 2009/10. Through this online talk, Dennis will explore the work of these two influential designers who were at the heart of the cultural explosion in London in the sixties. The Foale and Tuffin label was what cool girls wore – colourful, pop-inspired mini-dresses and trend-setting trouser suits were just some of the key pieces that were ahead of their time in developing popular, desirable fashion. Foale and Tuffin: Made in England charts the very personal story of two women who set up on their own with just a lot of courage and £200 in their pockets, to becoming two key British fashion designers of the 1960s and the part they played in creating the changing London scene. Book now.

The Skill of Narrative & Stitched Textiles

The 62 Group of Textile Artists presents The Skill of Narrative & Stitched Textiles, the third talk in their popular annual lecture series at the Fashion and Textile Museum. This online lecture will introduce 62 Group members Emily Jo Gibbs and Richard McVetis and their respective projects The Value of Making and The Potential of Stitch. The Value of Making (a series of hand stitched portraits of makers) by Emily Jo Gibbs Emily investigates how by taking the time to slowly describe someone in stitch you convey your admiration. Celebrating people who make things by the investment of time in making their portraits, a quiet, thoughtful act of care and value. Emily will describe how this project grew out of a collaboration with Bridget Bailey exploring how one might make a portrait of an Artist and evolved into the championing of people who make things for a living, depicting them through the tools that they use. Initially Emily chose seven contemporary Makers whose work she admired because of their design aesthetic, making skills and materiality, across a broad range of disciplines. Katie Treggiden wrote, ‘there are things Emily is able to articulate through the physically invested work of stitching…. that might elude both writers and photographers’. Gibbs will conclude by talking about her latest project that continues the conversation The Potential of Stitch by Richard McVetis This paper explores a 15-year fascination and obsession with a single stitch technique and how the expressive properties of this process have enabled Richard to visualise abstract concepts such as Time and Space. It is through stitch and making that Richard investigate time and place. Using hand embroidery, he records his time through multiples of dots, lines, and crosses meticulously stitched. Each drawn mark or stitch is a mantra; the stitches become markers of lived time. This seemingly humble, inconsequential repetitive action often overlooked and dismissed as part of the mundane. Connotations of the domestic reduce these actions to the field of the home, of the amateur, for Richard, however, it restores a sense of order. It informs a more profound comprehension and connection to the world. There is intimacy in this labour-intensive way of making; the ritual and repetition create an in-depth focus and an internal Space-Time specific to the artist. This thinking will be explored through a series of McVetis’s recent artworks, whilst also referring to the practice of Agnes Martin and Vija Celmins, whose deep focus and skill helped translate feelings and the world around them. Book now. 

Discover HMS Belfast Story

Published on 29th December 2020

Uncategorised

Whilst you are unable to visit in person, IWM have created an interactive timeline where you’re able to explore the HMS Belfast Story. Discover it’s history, hear the unique stories of those who served on board, and read about the adventures that the Royal Navy cruiser embarked on as a world-touring warship, from the Arctic Circle to East Asia. Explore the timeline here.  Image: HMS Belfast leaving Scapa Flow for the Normandy beaches, June 1944. © IWM (A 25665) ©IWM (A 25665)

Tower Bridge Beach

Published on 21st December 2020

Uncategorised

Believe it or not, between 1930 and 1970 the Tower of London used to be just at popular for its beach as it was for it Tower. Families would flock to the ‘seaside’ even dipping their toes in the ‘sea.’ Children would build sandcastles and eat ice cream whilst there was entertainment and deck chairs to rent.  Many of the families who went to the beach were from the East End and couldn’t afford to go to the seaside in holiday, and would regularly visit. The beach was officially opened in 23 July, 1934 when King George V declared the area would remain free for the city’s children to use. The beach closed during the war, but resumed in 1946. It wasn’t until the 1970’s that there were concerns over pollution in the river with the beach officially closing in 1971. Image: Henry Grant

GAIL BRODHOLT: POETRY, PROSE & PRINT

Published on 04th February 2020

Gail Brodholt is a voracious reader, constantly inspired by the written word. Her stunning linocuts—often depicting the London Underground, train stations, and other scenes of transport—obtain their titles from pieces of poetry or prose that have touched her in some way. This exhibition at Eames Fine Art Gallery coincides with a prestigious project that Gail has been working on with London Transport. She was commissioned to produce prints for two posters to support their initiative ‘Hidden London,’ which aims to open up the secrets of disused parts of the London Underground network. Gail was asked to feature two stations: The Strand / Aldwych station and the Highgate High Level station. Both of these striking posters will be displayed throughout London early 2020. Find out more.

Anselm Kiefer at White Cube Bermondsey

Published on 30th October 2019

White Cube Bermondsey presents a major solo exhibition by Anselm Kiefer encompassing large-scale painting and installation. Find out more Image: Anselm Kiefer, ‘Il mistero delle cattedrali‘, South Gallery 2011

ZOO HUMANS by THE URBAN PLAYGROUND TEAM

Published on 17th September 2019

Inspired by the shocking statistic that three quarters of young people in the UK spend less time outdoors than prisoners, Zoo Humans sees The UPG Team bring their distinctive performance-parkour and David Attenborough’s smooth narrative to a group of humans on the verge of forgetting how to move. Join us for these free, outdoor performances. This performance is part of Dance Umbrella, London’s international dance festival, celebrating 21st century choreography across the capital. 8 – 27 October. Performances at 1.45PM and 5.30PM Presented in partnership with Team London Bridge with King’s College London and Woolwich Cultural Destinations. Guy’s Courtyard London Bridge SE1 9GU