Tag: London Bridge

An Interview with Bermondsey Street Bees

Published on 15th February 2019

General

When stockbroker Dale Gibson set up his first beehives on a Bermondsey Street rooftop in 2007, neither he or his partner Sarah Wyndham-Lewis could have predicted the experiences that lay ahead. Over a decade later, they reflect on the journey of their award-winning business and share thoughts on the crucial role of sustainable beekeeping in London.   Do you still think of beekeeping as a hobby? It started out as a hobby and has progressed into a mild obsession and a disruptive business! We’ve got a concept here that we think is unusual, which makes it easy to be passionate about. Sarah and I have developed experience over 30/40 years in the city and marketing sector, so we’re stepping into the bee, honey and consulting business as well as applying basic bee husbandry skills. We’re having a great time doing a lot of things we never anticipated doing. We’re very lucky to be working with so many different people who care about bees as much as we do – its helped us to develop what started as a hobby into a professional bee enterprise. Do you and the bees have a daily routine? The bees are variable, as they tend to do very little during the winter. The rule is that you have to have a reason to open up a bee hive, rather than just doing it on a curiosity basis.  We have schedules to inspect the bees, especially during the swarming season (when the first dandelion appears). The intensive period is between May/June where we’re on absolute peak duties, before things slow down after summer solstice when the queens egg laying rate starts to diminish. There are many things we can get on with in winter, processing the honey, bottling it, selling it, doing talks and making plans for new apiaries, but it’s different types of work at different times of the year.   “The rich history of bees in London is a wonderful thing, but we’re looking to ensure a rich future too.” What are the differences in how you practice urban beekeeping, to rural beekeeping? Aside from the logistic/ environmental differences, the benefits of keeping bees in London is 3 or 4 fold, firstly the temperature is 2 or 3 degrees higher than the surrounding countryside which means the plants are able to give nectar and to flower for longer. Also, because of people’s personal ambitions and tastes, we have a vast variety of flowers in gardens. Plus, there’s the benefit of inspired municipal planting, for example in Potters Fields Park. Ian Mould, the gardener puts in sequential planting so that the bees have something to eat all year round, he’s very observant and thoughtful about it. A particular focus and passion of ours is the creation of forage and ensuring that when we introduce more bees into a city like London, there will be sufficient creation of forage to to ensure our bees and the existing city bees will have enough to eat. That’s the primary responsibility of any farmer, sustainability. The rich history of bees in London is a wonderful thing, but we’re looking to ensure a rich future too. In terms of being a responsible beekeeper, what advice would you give local residents with an interest in bee-friendly planting?  Let’s start with some really broad brush strokes – anything blue or purple is good as the bee’s vision is acutely adjusted towards those sort of flowers. Think of your garden as if it’s something that’s going to bear fruit and  have flavours – herbs, fruit trees. We have a lovely damson tree on our allotment and herb garden here up on the roof. We always feel like there’s something for us to have, taste and enjoy the flavour of as well as the bees – all things can fit together and consciously bridge the gap between people and bees. Team London Bridge has done a fantastic job of developing green spaces in the area, projects like the Greenwood Theatre, the Druid Street wildflower meadow, the hanging baskets – it all helps! We have planting guides on our Bermondsey Bees website, great for rooftop plantings which have high wind and are prone to being quite arid. Does Bermondsey Street Bees honey have a signature taste? Every honey has its own terroir like a fine wine or olive oil, they’re all in their own batches. No two vintages will be the same. The honey is affected by the weather and the plants that thrive in different conditions. Ours has a clarity and a slight tang with a lift of mint in the final taste. It has a little twist of citrus (lime tree rather than actual citrus fruit), and that multi-floral complexity that London honey often has. We don’t heat the honey above the hive temperature, which is the opposite of super-heated, filtered and entirely denatured squeezable supermarket bottles. Each jar will always have its own personality, body and soul, that captures the essence of the surroundings and the year itself, and and we’re proud of that. “Each jar will always have its own personality, body and soul, that captures the essence of the surroundings and the year itself, and and we’re proud of that.”   What is your relationship with the local community? In cities, your door often opens straight onto the street: rather than a long row of trees leading up to a long drive, or a deep suburban garden with a hedge or wall around it. We just flow straight onto the street and straight into the community. For the last 10 years, we’ve been intimately associated with Bermondsey Street, whether that’s previously being secretary of BSAP (Bermondsey Street Area Partnership) or judging a dog show at Bermondsey Street Festival! We always use local suppliers for our products, like French Flint, the local glass guy by Leathermarket or collaborating with local brewery Hiver Beers who we’re collaborating with on selling honey beer at a retail space in Maltby Street market. We’ve also been quite successful in getting out into the community where we’ve been planting in St Mary Magdalen Church Yard with a large grant from Southwark’s ‘Cleaner Greener Safer’ fund. We planted an edible garden in Leathermarket gardens with the help of BOST (Bankside Open Spaces Trust) and we’re currently working with Team London Bridge and Southwark Council to put together a green roof with the aid of local artist Austin Emery and Leathermarket JMB. These joint ventures from very local enterprising focusing on a single outcome can be very powerful, the help we’ve had from the larger organisations as small individuals has been enormously encouraging. We feel fortunate to be in the middle of an environment where we had cooperation and collaboration across the board. You mentioned Sarah’s background in marketing, what is Sarah’s role in Bermondsey Street Bees? Dale: She’s my partner… Sarah: Whether I like it or not! It’s crept up on me somehow. I do branding, marketing, design, product development, and project management. I also manage the retail and wholesale sales. Dale: Sarah is also the loony project prevention officer. I’m very keen on embarking on mad projects, and Sarah is very keen on not allowing me to do that! Sarah: There’s a great saying from someone I used to work with, he said ‘there’s a very big difference between starting a business and being busy fools’. We try to keep the business progressive, moving forward, taking people with us on a journey. This is a big learning curve because of all the sustainability issues. My parents were farmers so I do have that background of using the land and being respectful to creatures, but you start applying that to urban beekeeping and you suddenly realise how fragile the urban economy is for a bee or for a small creature. At one point I questioned, why should we expect to have bees in London? Is it reasonable for Londoners to expect to have bees? Sarah: There are actually lots of answers. One is- why shouldn’t Londoners have local honey? Bees do a great job pollinating people’s allotments, parks and gardens, and by pollinating, they’re also feeding the birds. When the seeds and fruits are properly pollinated, the trees and bushes can be more productive, so there’s an entire eco-structure being supported by the act of keeping bees and feeding them. It’s all very delicate and sensitive, and one disruptive factor, like taking away some green space and building on it can make a tremendous difference. Dale: People have got the message that a dog isn’t for Christmas, but a beehive isn’t just for decorative purposes either! We want to raise the standard to this becomes the norm for how people take care of bees, and for it to become the next step in sustainable beekeeping.   Eddie the pug. Sarah also founded Holly & Lil, the canine fashion boutique which previously shared the ground floor of Bermondsey Street Bees HQ What’s next? We’ve got some great projects coming up, we’ve recently opened a honey library and prep kitchen which is specifically designed for our commercial clients for chefs to come in, recognise an environment which they’re familiar with and come and taste and talk about honey as a key ingredient in cooking. We think that’s going to be our target market so we want that to the focus of for the particular venue. We’re also opening up in Hiver Beers arch in Maltby Street, where we’ll have a small retail concession, which will hopefully give us some sort of visibility. Sarah: We’re currently doing something special with the Shangri La at The Shard. We designed a unique honeycomb stand inspired by The Shard for hotel breakfast tables – and Shangri La bought the very first one. We’ve also organised a supply chain for them with one of our partner beekeepers. It’s very artisanal: He went into his fields in the depths of the country – and set up some hives to make honey exclusively for the Shangri La. It’s just fantastically natural and straightforward…. I love the idea that visitors from all over the world are getting to taste a fine, raw English honey, and it’s presented in such a glamorous way! This interview is from the 2016 AtLondonBridge archives  You can sneak a glimpse into the world of Bermondsey Street Bees in this episode of BBC’s Inside Out London. Featured from 21 minutes. Find out more here.

A German Life at The Bridge Theatre

Published on 13th February 2019

Maggie Smith returns to the theatre for the first time in 12 years in the world premiere of Christopher Hampton’s play A German Life at The Bridge Theatre. The play, drawn from the life and testimony of Brunhilde Pomsel is directed by Jonathan Kent and will have a limited 5 week run. “I had no idea what was going on. Or very little. No more than most people. So you can’t make me feel guilty.” Brunhilde Pomsel’s life spanned the twentieth century. She struggled to make ends meet as a secretary in Berlin during the 1930s, her many employers including a Jewish insurance broker, the German Broadcasting Corporation and, eventually, Joseph Goebbels. Christopher Hampton’s play is based on the testimony she gave when she finally broke her silence to a group of Austrian filmmakers, shortly before she died in 2016. Tickets will be available to the general public from 10am on Tuesday 26 February. Find out more / book tickets

Science Gallery Café

Published on 05th February 2019

The Science Gallery Café is a dining destination in its own right,  ideally situated right outside London Bridge station and the Shard. The light, spacious café is located on the ground floor of the dynamic exhibition space, overlooking the beautiful newly restored Georgian courtyard. It makes an ideal venue for breakfast, brunch, lunch and afternoon tea for visitors and locals alike. With an emphasis on ethically sourced local produce, the open kitchen serves a varied menu of sharing plates, deli sandwiches and market main plates alongside locally roasted coffee and fresh juices. The Science Gallery Cafe is offering London Bridge DealCard holders 10% off all food and drink.  Vegetarian and vegan options are always available, check out some sample menus below. SAMPLE BREAKFAST AND BRUNCH MENU SAMPLE LUNCH MENU JANUARY LUNCH ‘MARKET’ MENU VIEW SAMPLE DRINKS MENU Planning ahead? You can book a table at the Science Gallery Cafe by calling +44(0)7500 783652. Walk-ins are always welcome.  The café is licenced to serve alcohol and operates a Challenge 25 policy. Open 7.30am Breakfast 8am-11.30am Lunch 12pm-2.30pm Afternoon tea 2.30pm-6pm

£10 lunch offer @ Santo Remedio

Published on 04th February 2019

It’s February, the month of Valentine’s Day and the feeling that Winter will be eternal before Spring is finally upon us. In Mexico Valentine’s Day is not just for couples, it is the National day of Love AND Friendship.  So, Santo Remedio is offering London Bridge DealCard holders a very special offer for the entire month of February, exclusively for their friends and neighbours. This way you and your friends can get out the office and bring a bit of sunshine to your lunchtime this February! £10 lunch dish + side  – details here Just pop in, or to book a table visit www.SantoRemedio.co.uk *Offer valid Monday to Wednesday lunchtime from 12pm to 3pm. You must show your Team London Bridge card to qualify for this offer. Offer ends 27th February

Tracey Emin, A Fortnight of Tears at White Cube Bermondsey

Published on 21st January 2019

Tracey Emin’s new exhibition ‘A Fortnight of Tears’ at White Cube Bermondsey brings together new painting, photography, large-scale sculpture, film and neon text. The collection stems from Emin’s deeply personal memories and emotions ranging from loss, grief, longing and spiritual love. Three monumental bronze sculptural figures – the largest Emin has produced to date -are shown alongside her lyrical and expressive paintings. Developed through a process of drawing, the paintings are then intensely reworked and added to, layer upon layer. White Cube also debuts a new photographic series by Emin titled ‘Insomnia’. Selected from thousands of self-portraits taken by the artist on her iPhone over the last couple of years, these images spontaneously capture prolonged periods of restlessness and inner turmoil.

Flat Iron – London Bridge

Published on 18th January 2019

The Tooley Street branch of Flat Iron in London Bridge is the latest of their six restaurants, all serving delicious steak, cooked to perfection, at reasonable prices. Flat Iron also serve a selection of sides and sauces to accompany the main event. Tips: do try the Negroni fountain/ don’t ask if they serve chicken! Walk-in only https://flatironsteak.co.uk  

Swinging London: A Lifestyle Revolution / Terence Conran – Mary Quant

Published on 15th January 2019

The Fashion and Textile Museum have revealed their next exhibition: Swinging London: A Lifestyle Revolution, arriving on February 8th 2019.  The exhibition will present the fashion, design and art of the Chelsea Set; a group of radical young architects, designers, photographers and artists who were redefining the concept of youth and challenging the established order in 1950s London. At the forefront of this group of young revolutionaries were Mary Quant and Terence Conran. Swinging London: A Lifestyle Revolution will span the period from 1952 – 1977 and will present fashion, textiles, furniture, lighting, homewares, ceramics and ephemera in an exhibition that explores not only the style but the socioeconomic importance of this transformative period of time. Key pieces include rare and early examples of designs by Conran and Quant, plus the avant-garde artists, designers and intellectuals who worked alongside them, such as designers Bernard and Laura Ashley, sculptor Eduardo Paolozzi and artist and photographer Nigel Henderson. Exhibition Dates: 8 February – 2 June 2019 Open Tuesdays to Saturdays, 11am–6pm Thursdays until 8pm Sundays, 11am–5pm Last admission 45 minutes before closing Closed Mondays Tickets Advance booking online is recommended but tickets may be purchased in person on the day of the visit, subject to availability. £9.90 adults* / £8.80 concessions* / £7 students * Includes 10% gift aid Children under 12 are free. Book Online

9 of the best vegan dishes in London Bridge

Published on 09th January 2019

General, Uncategorised

After the over-indulgence of the festive period, a record number of us are pledging to the plant-based diet. With movements like #Veganuary and the recent rise in awareness of planet-conscious eating, chefs all over the world are responding with imaginative vegan creations, packed full of flavour. Say goodbye to the bog-standard mushroom risotto and HELLO to these delicious dishes, all available right here in London Bridge.   1. By Chloe’s The Full Brekkie by CHLOE’s collaboration with Zanna Van Diijk is a twist on ‘The Full Engish’ featuring maple carrot bacon, jack fruit sausage, scrambled tofu, smoky cowboy beans, roasted plum tomatoes and whole shiitake mushrooms, served with a toasted buttered vegan English muffin and house-made Beet Ketchup. By Chloe. One Tower Bridge, 6 Duchess Walk, SE1 2SD   2. Santo Remedio’s Hibiscus Enchiladas Rolled tortillas filled with Hibiscus flowers sautéed in tomato and Chile Morita. Santo Remedio, 152 Tooley St, SE1 2TU   3. The Coal Shed’s Fire Roasted Squash  Fire roasted squash, Israeli couscous, pomegranate, walnuts and a spiced yoghurt dressing. The Coal Shed, 4 Crown Court, One Tower Bridge, SE1 2ZR   4. Gunpowder’s Porzhi Okra Fries  Gunpowder Tower Bridge, 4 Duchess Walk, SE1 2SD   5. Cafe Rouge’s Spicy Moroccan Vegetable Tagine Roasted courgette, carrots, butternut squash, baby spinach and chickpeas with toasted almonds and coriander chutney. Served with spiced coriander couscous. Cafe Rouge, Hays Galleria, Tooley St, SE1 2HD   6. Duddell’s Black Pepper Vegetarian ‘Chicken’  Duddell’s, 9a St Thomas St, SE1 9RY   7. Pizza Pilgrim’s Marinara Pizza  This classic Neopolitan Pizza is packed full of flavour – no cheese needed! Pizza Pilgrims, Unit SU48, Tooley St/ Bermondsey St, SE1 9SP   8. Leon’s Love Burger  Soya-beetroot patty topped with a vegan Carolina mustard mayo, Leon’s burger sauce, tomatoes, pickles, and a slice of smoked gouda-style vegan cheese, in between sourdough burger buns. More London/ London Bridge Station/ Borough High Street   9. The Ivy Tower Bridge’s Dukka Spiced Sweet Potato  Aubergine baba ganoush with coconut ‘yoghurt,’ sesame, mixed grains, toasted almonds and a Moroccan tomato sauce. The Ivy Tower Bridge, One Tower Bridge, Tower Bridge Rd, SE1 2AA   Find more restaurants in London Bridge >> 

15% Discount at Prosecco House

Prosecco House is a specialised wine bar where guests can buy, sample and learn about DOCG Prosecco on the south bank of the River Thames at One Tower Bridge. With a strong passion for wine, food, and love for Veneto region, the team are introducing classical ‘aperitivo’ culture to London. Customers can appreciate an Italian atmosphere and taste authentic high-quality DOCG Prosecco. Prosecco House is offering London Bridge DealCard holders a 15% discount. Simply show your card when ordering to receive your discount. 

Gunpowder, Tower Bridge

Gunpowder’s Fast Feast Deal

Gunpowder is a home-style Indian kitchen located in Spitalfields and Tower Bridge. The menu is an interpretation of beloved family recipes showcasing the vibrant confident flavours of home cooking. Gunpowder is offering London Bridge DealCard holders access to their Fast Feast Deal Menu. The menu includes 5 dishes at just £16pp available at lunch and dinner. Book by emailing ria@gunpowderlondon.com. / walk-ins also welcome. View Menu Ts&Cs: Available Monday – Friday in January from Thursday 10th January. Shared between two people at £16pp The whole table must take the set menu. Book by emailing ria@gunpowderlondon.com. Must show DealCard to redeem.