Tag: London Bridge

Enter the #londonbridgespring photo competition!

Published on 23rd April 2019

Uncategorised

We’re celebrating the arrival of spring with the #londonbridgespring competition! Blossoms in St John’s Churchyard, The Shard glinting in the sunshine, echinacea blooming in Potters Fields Park; London Bridge is full of the sights and smells of springtime – and we want you to capture it! Share and tag your photographs of London Bridge on Instagram (or Twitter) with the hashtag #londonbridgespring before 15.05.2019 for the chance to win local goodies. In the spirit of ‘new beginnings,’ we’re offering over £500 worth of treats from the neighbourhood’s latest edition, including: Build a bracelet* at Pandora’s London Bridge bridge shop in the Western Arcade of London Bridge Station.  *Prize value £125. Only redeemable in Pandora London Bridge. ID will be required on collection. Prize not refundable/ transferable.  Pizza Pilgrims: Carbonara Pizza for 2. Enjoy 2 of these deliciously naughty guest pizzas at their new branch in London Bridge. Giddy Grocer is offering the winner a special hamper to collect from their Bermondsey Street store, packed full of gourmet delights. Kiehl’s: £30 voucher to spend at their Western Arcade branch, plus a goody bag. Gunpowder Tower Bridge: The Gunpowder Cookbook ‘Explosive Flavours from Modern India‘ is an exciting collection of recipes , named in the top 20 cookbooks of last year. Their latest branch opened in One Tower Bridge in 2018. PLUS the top 10 entries will have their photography printed and displayed in the London Bridge Hive. To enter 1. Follow @atlondonbridge on Instagram 2. Share your photo capturing spring in London Bridge on Instagram (or Twitter) 3. Use the hashtag #londonbridgespring Instagram @atlondonbridge The winners will be announced on May 16th 2019. Happy tagging!

Mother’s Day take over at Santo Remedio

Published on 21st March 2019

“Mother knows best”; a mantra that Santo Remedio is taking to heart this Mother’s Day.  From the 29th-21st March, Edison and Natalie’s mothers will take over the kitchen for a unique family celebration, cooking the traditional Mexican dishes that originally inspired the husband and wife team. Edson’s mother, Luz Maria Moraover will be flying in especially from Mexico City to recreate special dishes rarely enjoyed in the UK, such as Chile Ancho Relleno (stuffed sundried Ancho chillies with beef, pork, mixed nuts and fruits with a tomato salsa). Natalie’s mother Patricia is a Mexican-Londoner and will prepare Mole Verde, a celebratory dish that she most misses from Mexico. Guests can enjoy live music throughout the day and all mothers joining the celebration will be treated to a glass of Laurent Perrier champagne. The dishes will be available from Friday 29th-Sunday 31st March. Book your table Mum’s the word!

Hamleys

Published on 13th March 2019

Hamleys was founded by William Hamley as “Noahs Ark” in High Holborn, London, in 1760 and is now the oldest and best-known toy shop in the world.  Their London Bridge branch is located in London Bridge Station’s Western Arcade.

Pandora

Discover Pandora’s unique range of jewellery including hand-finished charms, bracelets, necklaces, rings and pendants to match your style and personality. Pandora London Bridge is located in the Western Arcade of London Bridge Station.

The Inspirational Women of London Bridge

Published on 07th March 2019

General

In the spirit of International Women’s Day, we’ve rounded up a host of leading ladies. As well as their achievements shaping London Bridge as it is today, their influence transcends postcodes, cities, and even continents. They’ve motivated change in fields including nursing, fair-trade, fashion and LGBT rights: meet the Inspirational women of London Bridge…   1. Dame Zandra Rhodes DBE, RDI, Fashion Designer Zandra’s early textile designs were considered too outrageous by the traditional British manufacturers, so, she decided to make dresses from her own fabrics, pioneering the very special use of printed textiles as an intrinsic part of the garments she created. She has been Commander of the British Empire since 1997 (in recognition of her contribution to fashion and textiles) and has nine Honorary Doctorates from Universities in both the UK and USA. Zandra set up the Fashion and Textile Museum here in London Bridge in 2003. Painted in her trademark pink and orange,  you can’t miss the stunning Bermondsey Street landmark. 2. Sophi Tranchell MBE, CEO of Divine Chocolate Sophi Tranchell, winner of Schwab Social Entrepreneur of the Year  (the most prestigious international award for social innovation!) is the CEO of London Bridge-based fair-trade chocolate company, Divine Chocolate. She has led this innovative company since 1999, from a team of 4 to the international £12.6m company it is today.  The company’s unique business model – which gives cocoa farmers the biggest share, and seats on the Board, in addition to the benefits from Fairtrade – has become a leading example of what is possible both in the Fairtrade movement and of a social enterprise reaching international scale in a highly competitive sector. Quote – BBC News   3. Florence Nightingale  OM, RRC, Founder of Modern Nursing The Lady with the Lamp’s pioneering work during the Crimean war lead to revolutionary progression in the field of medical care for soldiers. Florence Nightingale became involved with St Thomas’s Hospital in London Bridge in 1859. Florence helped establish numerous nursing organizations throughout the remainder of her life and received a hoard of awards for her work, including the German order of the Cross of Merit and the French gold medal of Secours aux Blessés Militaires. 4. Amy Lamé Night Czar at London City Hall Amy Lamé was appointed by The Mayor as London’s first Night Czar in 2016.  The comedian and broadcaster has a long and successful track record as a leader and collaborator in the cultural and creative industries. She is co-founder of the Olivier Award winning arts company and club night Duckie. Amy also co-founded and chairs RVT Future, a voluntary LGBT+ community group campaigning to preserve the iconic Royal Vauxhall Tavern. She’s made a priority tackling sexual assault against women on public transport, and boosting the safety of women on nights out. Quote – Evening Standard   5. Kerry Taylor  Founder of Kerry Taylor Auctions Kerry Taylor joined renowned auction house Sotheby’s in 1979 and rapidly rose through the ranks to become the youngest auctioneer in the company’s history at just 21. In 2003 she left to set up her own auction business, specialising in fashion and textiles. Since leaving Sotheby’s Kerry’s unrivalled expertise, passion and experience have led her business (Kerry Taylor Auction’s based locally on Long Lane) to be regarded as the world’s leading auction house specialising in vintage fashion, fine antique costume and textiles. Quote – Modcloth Blog   6. Caryl Jenner – Founder of the Unicorn Theatre The Unicorn Theatre was founded by Caryl Jenner as a touring company in 1947 with a commitment to giving children a valuable and often first ever experience of quality theatre, and a philosophy that ‘the best of theatre for children should be judged on the same high standards of writing, directing, acting and design as the best of adult theatre‘. Today, the Unicorn is the UK’s leading professional theatre for young audiences, dedicated to inspiring and invigorating young people of all ages, perspectives and abilities, and empowering them to explore the world – on their own terms – through theatre.

Taste the Greatness of Northern Ireland at Borough Market

Published on 06th March 2019

Join Borough Market for ‘Taste the Greatness of Northern Ireland’, a regional showcase of Northern Irish delicacies from 13th-23rd March. Northern Ireland was awarded the accolade of ‘Best International Food Destination’ at the prestigious International Travel and Tourism Awards in November last year, firmly cementing its place on the gastronomic world map. This regional showcase will bring to life the acclaimed array of produce sourced from this small, yet mighty, region. On Sunday 17th, there will be a family-free St Patrick’s day celebration, when visitors can enjoy food, drink, cookery demos, live entertainment and of course the great produce of Northern Ireland to sample and purchase. There will be a storytelling corner and face painting to keep the children happy, displays of traditional Irish dancing and cookery demos from Northern Ireland’s celebrity chef Paula McIntyre, with plenty of recipes to take home for visitors to rustle up a St Patrick’s Day feast. Free admission. Find out more >>

The Polar Bears Go, Go, Go!

Published on 04th March 2019

The Unicorn Theatre invites you to join the two very loveable but slightly hapless Polar Bears on their holiday adventures. Will they ever reach their destination? Or are they just going around in circles?  Have your ticket ready, find your seat, fasten your seatbelt and anchors aweigh – take off and go, go, go! The Polar Bears return to the Unicorn following the hit shows The Polar Bears Go Wild (2015) and The Polar Bears Go Up (2016). The pair create smart, sharply observed comic performances for our youngest audiences. Find out more 

An Interview with Bermondsey Street Bees

Published on 15th February 2019

General

When stockbroker Dale Gibson set up his first beehives on a Bermondsey Street rooftop in 2007, neither he or his partner Sarah Wyndham-Lewis could have predicted the experiences that lay ahead. Over a decade later, they reflect on the journey of their award-winning business and share thoughts on the crucial role of sustainable beekeeping in London.   Do you still think of beekeeping as a hobby? It started out as a hobby and has progressed into a mild obsession and a disruptive business! We’ve got a concept here that we think is unusual, which makes it easy to be passionate about. Sarah and I have developed experience over 30/40 years in the city and marketing sector, so we’re stepping into the bee, honey and consulting business as well as applying basic bee husbandry skills. We’re having a great time doing a lot of things we never anticipated doing. We’re very lucky to be working with so many different people who care about bees as much as we do – its helped us to develop what started as a hobby into a professional bee enterprise. Do you and the bees have a daily routine? The bees are variable, as they tend to do very little during the winter. The rule is that you have to have a reason to open up a bee hive, rather than just doing it on a curiosity basis.  We have schedules to inspect the bees, especially during the swarming season (when the first dandelion appears). The intensive period is between May/June where we’re on absolute peak duties, before things slow down after summer solstice when the queens egg laying rate starts to diminish. There are many things we can get on with in winter, processing the honey, bottling it, selling it, doing talks and making plans for new apiaries, but it’s different types of work at different times of the year.   “The rich history of bees in London is a wonderful thing, but we’re looking to ensure a rich future too.” What are the differences in how you practice urban beekeeping, to rural beekeeping? Aside from the logistic/ environmental differences, the benefits of keeping bees in London is 3 or 4 fold, firstly the temperature is 2 or 3 degrees higher than the surrounding countryside which means the plants are able to give nectar and to flower for longer. Also, because of people’s personal ambitions and tastes, we have a vast variety of flowers in gardens. Plus, there’s the benefit of inspired municipal planting, for example in Potters Fields Park. Ian Mould, the gardener puts in sequential planting so that the bees have something to eat all year round, he’s very observant and thoughtful about it. A particular focus and passion of ours is the creation of forage and ensuring that when we introduce more bees into a city like London, there will be sufficient creation of forage to to ensure our bees and the existing city bees will have enough to eat. That’s the primary responsibility of any farmer, sustainability. The rich history of bees in London is a wonderful thing, but we’re looking to ensure a rich future too. In terms of being a responsible beekeeper, what advice would you give local residents with an interest in bee-friendly planting?  Let’s start with some really broad brush strokes – anything blue or purple is good as the bee’s vision is acutely adjusted towards those sort of flowers. Think of your garden as if it’s something that’s going to bear fruit and  have flavours – herbs, fruit trees. We have a lovely damson tree on our allotment and herb garden here up on the roof. We always feel like there’s something for us to have, taste and enjoy the flavour of as well as the bees – all things can fit together and consciously bridge the gap between people and bees. Team London Bridge has done a fantastic job of developing green spaces in the area, projects like the Greenwood Theatre, the Druid Street wildflower meadow, the hanging baskets – it all helps! We have planting guides on our Bermondsey Bees website, great for rooftop plantings which have high wind and are prone to being quite arid. Does Bermondsey Street Bees honey have a signature taste? Every honey has its own terroir like a fine wine or olive oil, they’re all in their own batches. No two vintages will be the same. The honey is affected by the weather and the plants that thrive in different conditions. Ours has a clarity and a slight tang with a lift of mint in the final taste. It has a little twist of citrus (lime tree rather than actual citrus fruit), and that multi-floral complexity that London honey often has. We don’t heat the honey above the hive temperature, which is the opposite of super-heated, filtered and entirely denatured squeezable supermarket bottles. Each jar will always have its own personality, body and soul, that captures the essence of the surroundings and the year itself, and and we’re proud of that. “Each jar will always have its own personality, body and soul, that captures the essence of the surroundings and the year itself, and and we’re proud of that.”   What is your relationship with the local community? In cities, your door often opens straight onto the street: rather than a long row of trees leading up to a long drive, or a deep suburban garden with a hedge or wall around it. We just flow straight onto the street and straight into the community. For the last 10 years, we’ve been intimately associated with Bermondsey Street, whether that’s previously being secretary of BSAP (Bermondsey Street Area Partnership) or judging a dog show at Bermondsey Street Festival! We always use local suppliers for our products, like French Flint, the local glass guy by Leathermarket or collaborating with local brewery Hiver Beers who we’re collaborating with on selling honey beer at a retail space in Maltby Street market. We’ve also been quite successful in getting out into the community where we’ve been planting in St Mary Magdalen Church Yard with a large grant from Southwark’s ‘Cleaner Greener Safer’ fund. We planted an edible garden in Leathermarket gardens with the help of BOST (Bankside Open Spaces Trust) and we’re currently working with Team London Bridge and Southwark Council to put together a green roof with the aid of local artist Austin Emery and Leathermarket JMB. These joint ventures from very local enterprising focusing on a single outcome can be very powerful, the help we’ve had from the larger organisations as small individuals has been enormously encouraging. We feel fortunate to be in the middle of an environment where we had cooperation and collaboration across the board. You mentioned Sarah’s background in marketing, what is Sarah’s role in Bermondsey Street Bees? Dale: She’s my partner… Sarah: Whether I like it or not! It’s crept up on me somehow. I do branding, marketing, design, product development, and project management. I also manage the retail and wholesale sales. Dale: Sarah is also the loony project prevention officer. I’m very keen on embarking on mad projects, and Sarah is very keen on not allowing me to do that! Sarah: There’s a great saying from someone I used to work with, he said ‘there’s a very big difference between starting a business and being busy fools’. We try to keep the business progressive, moving forward, taking people with us on a journey. This is a big learning curve because of all the sustainability issues. My parents were farmers so I do have that background of using the land and being respectful to creatures, but you start applying that to urban beekeeping and you suddenly realise how fragile the urban economy is for a bee or for a small creature. At one point I questioned, why should we expect to have bees in London? Is it reasonable for Londoners to expect to have bees? Sarah: There are actually lots of answers. One is- why shouldn’t Londoners have local honey? Bees do a great job pollinating people’s allotments, parks and gardens, and by pollinating, they’re also feeding the birds. When the seeds and fruits are properly pollinated, the trees and bushes can be more productive, so there’s an entire eco-structure being supported by the act of keeping bees and feeding them. It’s all very delicate and sensitive, and one disruptive factor, like taking away some green space and building on it can make a tremendous difference. Dale: People have got the message that a dog isn’t for Christmas, but a beehive isn’t just for decorative purposes either! We want to raise the standard to this becomes the norm for how people take care of bees, and for it to become the next step in sustainable beekeeping.   Eddie the pug. Sarah also founded Holly & Lil, the canine fashion boutique which previously shared the ground floor of Bermondsey Street Bees HQ What’s next? We’ve got some great projects coming up, we’ve recently opened a honey library and prep kitchen which is specifically designed for our commercial clients for chefs to come in, recognise an environment which they’re familiar with and come and taste and talk about honey as a key ingredient in cooking. We think that’s going to be our target market so we want that to the focus of for the particular venue. We’re also opening up in Hiver Beers arch in Maltby Street, where we’ll have a small retail concession, which will hopefully give us some sort of visibility. Sarah: We’re currently doing something special with the Shangri La at The Shard. We designed a unique honeycomb stand inspired by The Shard for hotel breakfast tables – and Shangri La bought the very first one. We’ve also organised a supply chain for them with one of our partner beekeepers. It’s very artisanal: He went into his fields in the depths of the country – and set up some hives to make honey exclusively for the Shangri La. It’s just fantastically natural and straightforward…. I love the idea that visitors from all over the world are getting to taste a fine, raw English honey, and it’s presented in such a glamorous way! This interview is from the 2016 AtLondonBridge archives  You can sneak a glimpse into the world of Bermondsey Street Bees in this episode of BBC’s Inside Out London. Featured from 21 minutes. Find out more here.

A German Life at The Bridge Theatre

Published on 13th February 2019

Maggie Smith returns to the theatre for the first time in 12 years in the world premiere of Christopher Hampton’s play A German Life at The Bridge Theatre. The play, drawn from the life and testimony of Brunhilde Pomsel is directed by Jonathan Kent and will have a limited 5 week run. “I had no idea what was going on. Or very little. No more than most people. So you can’t make me feel guilty.” Brunhilde Pomsel’s life spanned the twentieth century. She struggled to make ends meet as a secretary in Berlin during the 1930s, her many employers including a Jewish insurance broker, the German Broadcasting Corporation and, eventually, Joseph Goebbels. Christopher Hampton’s play is based on the testimony she gave when she finally broke her silence to a group of Austrian filmmakers, shortly before she died in 2016. Tickets will be available to the general public from 10am on Tuesday 26 February. Find out more / book tickets

Science Gallery Café

Published on 05th February 2019

The Science Gallery Café is a dining destination in its own right,  ideally situated right outside London Bridge station and the Shard. The light, spacious café is located on the ground floor of the dynamic exhibition space, overlooking the beautiful newly restored Georgian courtyard. It makes an ideal venue for breakfast, brunch, lunch and afternoon tea for visitors and locals alike. With an emphasis on ethically sourced local produce, the open kitchen serves a varied menu of sharing plates, deli sandwiches and market main plates alongside locally roasted coffee and fresh juices. The Science Gallery Cafe is offering London Bridge DealCard holders 10% off all food and drink.  Vegetarian and vegan options are always available, check out some sample menus below. SAMPLE BREAKFAST AND BRUNCH MENU SAMPLE LUNCH MENU JANUARY LUNCH ‘MARKET’ MENU VIEW SAMPLE DRINKS MENU Planning ahead? You can book a table at the Science Gallery Cafe by calling +44(0)7500 783652. Walk-ins are always welcome.  The café is licenced to serve alcohol and operates a Challenge 25 policy. Open 7.30am Breakfast 8am-11.30am Lunch 12pm-2.30pm Afternoon tea 2.30pm-6pm